February 17, 2019


In Your Prayers

 

In Nursing Homes or Convalescing:
Renee Alberico
Randy Albert
John Bakuhn (Jameson Rehab)
Mikalyn Dado
Betty Farris
Rose Hanna (Rhodes Estates)
Daphne Harvey
Elizabeth Horney
Elias (Paizon) Jacobs (Edison)
Jim Macom
Joel Scalzo (Carriage House)
Nancy Thomas (Avalon)
Memory Eternal!
Dannie Toney

 

News and Notes

 

 

Kibbee Sale: THANK YOU to everyone who worked on Saturday to make the kibbee. Your efforts are very much appreciated! Please don't forget to pick up your kibbee.

 

THIS WEEK IS FAST FREE! Spend it wisely...

Why? Note that we progress in strictness: This week, no fast; Next week, regular fast (Wed & Fri); The next (Meatfare), no meat; and then finally the Great Fast begins (no meat, no dairy). The Church is easing us into this regimen. Thank you, Subdeacon David, for reminding me of this.

 

Forgiveness Verspers: Sunday, March 10

 

The schedule for Lent is somewhat different this year. Details are forthcoming.

 

 

This Week's Events
Saturday, February 16

Events:

 

5:00 PM - Vespers

 

Sunday, February 17

Events:

 

9:00 AM - Sunday School for Kids and Adults

10:00 AM - Divine Liturgy

 

Monday, February 18

Events:


6:00 PM- Intercessory Prayers followed by class


Tuesday, February 19

Events:

 

 

Wednesday, February 20

Events:

 


Thursday, February 21

Events:


 

Friday, February 22

Events:


 

Saturday, February 23

Events:

 

5:00 PM - Vespers

 

 

Sunday, February 24

Events:


9:00 AM - Sunday School for Kids and Adults

10:00 AM - Divine Liturgy

 

Fr. is available for confessions 1 hour before Vespers or upon request



 


Sunday's Epistle


THE EPISTLE
(For Sunday of the Pharisee and Publican)
Make vows to the Lord thy God, and perform them.
In Judah God is known; His Name is great in Israel.
The Reading from the Second Epistle of St. Paul to St. Timothy. (3:10-15)

            Timothy my son, you have observed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, my persecutions, and my sufferings; and what befell me at Antioch, at Iconium, and at Lystra. What persecutions I endured; yet from them all, the Lord rescued me. Indeed all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil men and impostors will go on from bad to worse, deceivers and deceived. But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings which are able to instruct you for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.

 


Sunday's Gospel


THE GOSPEL
(For Sunday of the Pharisee and Publican)
The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke. (18:10-14)

The Lord spoke this parable: “Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, ‘God, I thank Thee that I am not like other men, extortionists, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I get.’ But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to Heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted.”


From Father


As we prepare for Lent, we come upon the first of several Gospel readings that are meant to sharpen our dull spiritual senses.  We have lived in the world for some time now; Pascha was last April, and much has happened since.  The corruptions of modern living have clung to our souls like the grime of a muddy road clings to a white robe.  Our souls are in need of cleaning.  Have no fear.

 

The first and perhaps the greatest of the antidotes to the passions of today is found in today’s Gospel account of the Publican and the Pharisee.  This is the virtue of humility.

 

The Pharisee is pious.  Don’t sugarcoat this.  He is not corrupt in his living. He is an obedient follower of the Law – the laws of God which every person devoted to God would be expected to follow.  He is a student of the Scriptures.  He is theological.  He knows how to pray, down to the correct posture for a Pharisee and the correct form of his prayers.  These men knew what they were doing. 

 

Of course, the Pharisees knew their stuff so well that they also knew when someone else was not doing it correctly.  Like, you know, that tax collector over there.  A tax collector:  What a scum.

 

Except that scummy tax collector approached God with his head bowed, his fist beating his breast in lamentation, simply asking God to have mercy on him, sinner that he is.  And he, not the learned, theologically astute, liturgically perfect Pharisee, went away justified.

 

So as we enter Lent, humility need to be our constant companion, it needs to have a permanent place in our state of mind.  The Pharisee is condemned because he dared to judge another.  Who are we?  Do we dare to judge our brother or sister?  Do we keep watch of who communes, of who makes the sign of the cross wrong, of who is wearing jeans to church, of who fails to venerate the cross?  Who are we to worry about the shortcomings of others? The Pharisee was the perfect observant religious figure of his time: the counterpart to today’s perfect, literate, pious, scriptural, and theological Orthodox Christian!  Let this be our warning.  Let humility be our guide.  If we see someone doing something wrong, do not judge lest we be judged with the same harshness.  Instead, pray for God’s mercy on all: the sinner, and the saint who risks it all by daring to place himself or herself in God’s judgment seat.  Lord have mercy on me, a sinner.




The Children's Word